Celebrations & Traditions

Traditions provide connection and continuity within a church community. Some of our ongoing traditional celebrations are noted here. Information about special events will appear in the newsletter, postures and other notices, and announcements throughout the year.

Ingathering Sunday On the first Sunday after Labor Day (Second Sunday of September), members and friends bring a vial of water collected over the summer. The experiences and reflections of the summer are celebrated in the Water Ceremony. It is a time of renewal and reconnecting.

Harvest Feast and Communion As we enter the season of Thanksgiving, we gather as a commu­nity to share a common meal and give thanks. During the Sunday Morning service members and friends participate in a communion of apple cider and pumpkin bread.

Celebrations of the Winter Season Services the Sunday before Christmas may include a pageant for one service and a Solstice or other Winter Celebration during the second service.

Christmas Eve Candlelight Service In a Sanctuary lit by candles, we offer a time of contemplation and celebration to gather as a community during this season of hope.

Peeper Celebration Peepers are small tree frogs that are said to be a sure sign of Spring. In the 1970’s Rev. Larry Hamby, All Souls UU Church, introduced recognition of Peepers and Spring in place of Easter focus. When you hear peepers, call the church and give your name, location of the peepers, and date/time of call. The person who contacts the office first, is presented with the brass frog statute the following Sunday morning, and has the honor of being the "Peeper Keeper" until the next Peeper Sunday. The UUCC Peeper song is sung on the Sunday morning after the peepers are heard.

Religious Exploration Recognition Sunday In May, we lift up the children and adults who have been sharing their journey together this year in Religious Explo­ration. We invite them to share highlights of their spiritual explo­rations in worship. We honor the youth who have been part of the Coming of Age Community. We honor the youth who are bridging into and out of the Youth Group.

Youth Services At various times during the year, youth are invited to lead wor­ship service. The services are specific to their religious explora­tion. Services topics include but are not limited to: Coming-of Age, Owl, and Peace Jam.

Annual Meeting The first Sunday in June, we meet to exercise the democratic process that is one of our core principles. We appreciate the work of our leaders and invite new leadership. We approve a budget for the next fis­cal year. We discuss and vote on important questions affecting the life of the congregation

Flower Communion At the start of the summer, members bring and exchange flowers during the worship service. The beauty and diversity of the bou­quet represents the gifts we have as individuals gathered into community. The ritual of Flower Communion was begun by Norbert Capek in Prague. Capek founded the Unitarian Church in Czechoslovakia and within twenty years it was the largest Unitarian church in the world. Capek worked for religious free­dom and died in a Nazi prison camp in 1942. Our ceremony honors our Unitarian Universalist movement and all those who work for freedom of faith.

Earth-Based Celebrations  These are offered throughout the year as part of Sunday morning services, by Goddess Continuing group after the Second Service, or in other manners.

Child Dedication Ceremonies The Child Dedication Ceremony is a time for celebrating the birth or adoption of a child in a ceremony of naming and dedication. It is a time for celebrating the growing years of the young children in the family. It is a time for welcoming our children into the world, into the family and into the church community. It is a time for acknowledging that each child’s life is sacred and hold that truth in the light of our faith. FAQ

The Child Dedication Ceremony is a time for celebrating the birth or adoption of a child in a
ceremony of naming and dedication. It is a time for celebrating the growing years of the young
children in the family. It is a time for welcoming our children into the world, into the family and
into the church community. It is a time for acknowledging that each child’s life is sacred
and hold that truth in the light of our faith.